eSSL Biometric Secuwatch

February 22, 2011

Biometric attendance system at Karnataka University

HUBLI: Irregular and non-punctual staff will be dealt with an iron hand if they fail to be in Karnatak University (KUD) on time, thanks to biometrics fingerprints attendance system which has been installed at all the departments.

Hundreds of employees work at various sections of 52 departments at KUD. The manual attendance system is said to be a cause for concern among the heads of various departments to keep track of the attendance of their subordinates. Their not being punctual was adding to the problem.

The biometric system is expected to instil discipline among the employees so their efficiency is increased. KUD has also installed IP-based CCTV at libraries, administration building, examination building and the main annex to keep a watch on the behaviour of students in libraries and the movement of employees elsewhere.

R M Vatnal, chairman of IT department, which designed and implemented the system, told `The Times of India’ that biometric system is being used in important departments like finance, administration and examination. The biometric devices installed at all other departments are yet to be activated. “The biometric system is being run on a trial basis in some departments. It should be in place at all the departments in the next two months,” he added.

WHAT’S NEW

Instead of signing in the register, the employees will have to put the impression of their fingers on the device to register their attendance daily. The fingerprints of all employees have been uploaded in the system. The fingerprint-specific system also checks registration of proxy attendance.

The biometric devices will be operated from the main server located at the IT department. “We will send attendance report of each department to the heads concerned everyday so they can know the regularity/ punctuality of their subordinates,” Vatnal said, and added that the new system has cost KUD around Rs 5 lakh.

Source: Biometrics Attendance System

August 12, 2008

Leading player in Attendance, Access, CCTV, Fire Safety Solutions industry

eSSL

eSSL

September 23, 2007

Biometric Fingerprint Time Clocks

Buddy punching—not the violent connotation, but equally malicious and punishable under most corporate guidelines on proper employee behavior—is the practice of cheating time clocks by punching in the attendance card or swiping the ID of a co-worker in his absence.

Attendance monitoring used to mean endless paperwork, sifting though documents and manual computation. That has changed with the onslaught of biometric fingerprint time clocks that have high-tech applications but simple implementation.

There are several brands in the market, and they offer basically the same features, although some may be a bit more sophisticated (they allow several program schemes adaptable per employee specifications). A device can be programmed to quickly identify special work-schedule arrangements made for certain employees, for example.

A biometric fingerprint time clock generally is composed of three major components that make it work: scanner (on which one places a finger for the print to be scanned); software (that transforms the scanned information into digital format); and database (where authorized fingerprints are stored in digital format).

Biometric fingerprint time clocks may be installed on each side of a door to facilitate close monitoring of employee ins and outs. The biometric clock is wired into the door latch, allowing it to mechanically open and shut it. But if it’s just attendance monitoring you desire, one unit for your whole office may suffice. A device is capable of storing large amounts of data.

Once installed, you will have to get each employee to register a fingerprint. You may need to have your IT (information technology) employees help you with this. They will create a master list of names and their corresponding fingerprints. Additional programming is needed for flexi-time employees who do not subscribe to the general work-schedule hours.

After completing the database, the device ready. Employees will only need to put a finger on the scanning interface of the time clock. The print will be processed, and if it matches an image stored in the database, the door will open mechanically. If not, access will be denied; there’s no prying open the door or getting around the system.

eSSL

September 13, 2007

40,000 Schools fingerprint system project – India

“40,000 Schools fingerprint system pilot project (eSSL) inauguration by Hon. Chief Minister of Gujarat, Shri Narendra Modi”

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The Gujarat state government has initiated a pilot project to ensure full enrolment of all eligible students and to reduce dropout rate in primary schools.

The pilot project covers 680 primary schools, 70 Cluster Resource Centres (CRCs) and 4 Block Resources Centres (BRCs) in Narmada district, one of the most backward districts of Gujarat having predominant tribal population and low literacy. It will cover around 2,508 teachers and 76,000 students.

The pilots being implemented by Bangalore based enterprise Software Solutions Lab (ESSL).

In 2003, Gujarat Government had launched “Shala Praveshotsav” (Enrolment Drive) and “Kanya Kelavani Rath” (Girl Child Education Campaign), which has been very successful and is achieving full enrolment of all the eligible students.

However, while the extent of coverage of primary education in the state has been satisfactory, the high rate of dropout is a matter of serious concern.

Having achieved the successful enrolment, the challenge facing the Government is to improve retention and reduce the dropout.

It was discovered that apart from socio-economic reasons, absenteeism of teachers, particularly in tribal areas and remote villages is one of the most important reasons for high dropout rates,

“ All noble initiatives of the State Government lose effectiveness and seriousness, when teachers remain absent without due permission, for a long period. It was, therefore, urgently needed to have a strong and reliable mechanism to monitor attendance of teachers and students,” said a senior official.

A standalone fingerprint biometric machine with external uninterrupted power supply up to 12 hours will be installed in each primary school for recoding attendance of teachers as well as students. At the end of the month, the attendance data is transported to the taluka (Block) HQ in a portable memory device like a pen drive. This attendance data is processed with the help of a software application for getting pay rolls of teachers and other various reports.

The pilot project has great scope of further expansion depending upon its success in Narmada district. The pilot model of biometric attendance system is most likely to be replicated in all other districts of Gujarat if it is tested successfully in district like Narmada.

The expanded project is expected to cover around 40,000 schools, which are to be covered, in a phased manner, in the coming 2-3 years. 

Lift a Finger(print) to Track Employee Time

Automate hourly paid employee timekeeping with eSSL Biometric Time and Attendance System.

“Eliminate Buddy Punching” 

RFID based time and attendance systems have a big loophole: buddy punching. For example: Ram Come Lately, delayed on his way to work, can ask fellow employee Sunil Buddy to swipe Lately’s RFID employee badge through the time clock. The time clock will faithfully record Lately’s attendance before he arrives, and the employer will pay Lately for time that he didn’t work..

Biometric time systems eliminate buddy punching because they are inextricably linked to the employee, not to a token such as an employee badge or a time card.

eSSL eBiome time clock

The eSSL  eBiome time clock is a wall-mountable box with a optical fingerprint scanner, a monochrome backlit four-line LCD, and a numeric keypad with five menu-control buttons. The clock can be directly hooked up to a PC using a serial port, USB connection, or (the way I tested it) connected to a network via ethernet.

Once eSSL eBiome is installed, operations are fairly straightforward. You set up new employees using the eBiome software on the PC. Their fingerprints are then scanned and enrolled using a password-protected administration menu on the eBiome time clock.

“Easy Time Tracking”

The timekeeping process is simplicity itself. To record the start of work, an employee rests the enrolled finger on the eBiome time clock’s fingerprint sensor until it’s recognized. This requires just a second or two and is acknowledged with both a message on the display and an audio tone. To sign out from work, the employee repeats the fingerprint scan.

eSSL Logo - enterprise Software Solutions Lab

Is the eSSL eBiome Biometric Time and Attendance System worth it?

It’s certainly faster and more efficient to use than paper-based manual time tracking systems, and it’s probably more accurate than nonbiometric time systems. If you have five or more hourly paid employees, the system is cost-effective. While the ease of installation and the quality of documentation could be improved, once set up the system is simple enough to use–and it can save your business money by tracking time automatically and accurately.

August 24, 2007

Biometrics in 40,000 Schools of India

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Project Titled : “Fingerprint Biometric Attendance System for Primary Schools in Narmada District (Gujarat)”.

Brief Description:

Supply, installation and commissioning of 600 numbers of standalone Fingerprint Biometric Machines in various primary schools in Narmada District (Gujarat)

Tender Ref.: DPN/FBAS/01/2006

District Panchayat – Narmada
Jilla Panchayat Bhawan-Narmada,
Near Karjan Irrigation Project Office,
Rajpipla, Dist. Narmada (Gujarat) 393 145

Background:

To ensure full enrolment of all eligible students and to reduce drop-out rate in primary education, Government of Gujarat launched “Shala Praveshotsav” (Enrolment Drive) and “Kanya Kelavani Rath” (Girl Chid Education Campaign) from the year 2003. This programme has been very successful and is achieving full enrolment of all the eligible students. 

The extent of coverage of primary education in the state has been satisfactory but high rate of drop-out is a matter of serious concern. In the last three years, the Primary Education Department of Government of Gujarat has introduced several schemes to address the problem of drop-outs.

While lots of initiatives are being taken to improve primary education, it is equally important to sustain and deepen these reforms. After the success of enrolment drives with the achievement of full enrolment, the challenge now is to improve retention and reduce the drop-out.

Apart from socio-economic reasons, absenteeism of teachers, particularly in tribal areas and remote villages is one of the most important reasons for high dropout rates. All noble initiatives of the State Government lose effectiveness and seriousness, when teachers remain absent without due permission, for a long period. Above entioned areas, which are also the areas of lowest female literacy rates are suffering a lot because of this problem. It is urgently needed to have a strong and reliable mechanism to monitor attendance of teachers and students.

In order to have strict watch on the attendance of the teachers and the students, a Fingerprint Biometric School Attendance System was proposed for Narmada District. Government of Gujarat has accepted the proposal and has sanctioned a pilot project of a Fingerprint Biometric Attendance System for all primary schools in Narmada District to be implemented by the District Panchayat – Narmada (Rajpipla). After implementation, Narmada probably will become the first district in the country to cover all primary schools by a Fingerprint Biometric Attendance System.

Pilot Project:

The pilot project is planned to cover 680 primary schools, 70 Cluster Resource Centres (CRCs) and 4 Block Resources Centres (BRCs) in Narmada District. It will cover around 2508 teachers and 76,000 students. A stand alone fingerprint biometric machine with external un-interrupted power supply upto 12 hours will be installed in each primary school for recording attendance of teachers as well as students. At the end of the month, the attendance data will be transported to the taluka (Block) HQ in a portable memory device like a pen drive. This attendance data will be processed with the help of a software application for getting pay rolls of teachers and other various reports.

The pilot project has a great scope of further expansion depending upon its success in Narmada district. Narmada district is one of the most backward districts of Gujarat having predominant tribal population and low literacy indicators. The pilot model of biometric attendance system is most likely to be replicated in all other districts of Gujarat if it is tested successful in a district like Narmada. The expanded project is expected to cover around 40,000 schools, which are to be covered, in a phased manner, in the coming 2-3 years.

Pilot Project Implementation:

As an implementing agency District Panchayat – Narmada (Rajpipla) has decided that the procurement of the standalone Fingerprint Biometric Machines (FBMs) along with accessories would be through National Competitive Bidding while the software application would be developed by the NIC-Gujarat. To carry out this objective, District Panchayat – Narmada proposes to finalise a rate contract with only manufacturers of Fingerprint Biometric Machines (FBMs) in India for supply, installation and commissioning of standalone FBMs as per specifications given in the tender document.

Card-Based Systems and Biometric Applications to Drive Security Markets

Source: http://www.networkcomputing.in/InfSecurityAug10-07CardBasedSystemsandBiometricApplicationstoDriveSecurityMarkets.aspx 

Heightened concerns over security along with liberalization and strong economic growth have driven the Asia Pacific region toward high-end electronic access control systems in recent years.

The sheer size of the market combined with low penetration levels make for huge market potential, and the advent of IP-based surveillance systems, the development of property sector in Asia acific, and fewer biometrics regulatory issues in Asia Pacific as compared to other markets such as the United States and the United Kingdom are all expected to contribute to the future growth of electronic access control systems (EACS) in the region, said a new analysis from Frost and Sullivan.

The analysis on Electronic Access Control Systems Market in Selected APAC Countries, revealed that revenues in this market totaled $0.50 billion in 2006, and are likely to reach $1.34 billion in 2013.

“EACS have been growing in importance since the last ten years and the primary reasons for this are the sophistication and increased security offered by them and also the flexibility in their deployment that provides numerous reconfiguring options to customers,” said Frost & Sullivan Analysts Parul Oswal and Navin Rajendra. “Additionally, the overriding need to reduce fraud across government and commercial settings is boosting the demand for EACS. Both governments and corporate are deploying access control technology for applications ranging from time and attendance to physical access.”

Among EACS product types, keypads presently account for the highest revenue percent share in the EACS markets of countries examined in this study. However, this is likely to change by 2013, with some countries expected to leapfrog keypads and go to card-based or biometrics-based technologies that provide higher security.

“On the other hand access cards, comprising proximity and contactless, are likely to experience increased adoption rates, and their share is expected to increase from 32.6 percent in 2008 to almost 60.0 percent by 2013,” said Oswal. “Demand for biometrics is also likely to increase due to technology advancement, increasing concerns over security and the growing urgency to catch up with the western markets.”

Notwithstanding these positives, high investment and the cost of integration of the technology with the existing backend system are likely to be key restraints for the markets growth. Moreover, as there are no local integrators in the Asia Pacific region, there is a dearth of quality integration services, leading to poor market penetration for many technologies.

“Employee ID projects in private organizations do not enjoy the same economies of scale as government projects, due to the lower rate of card shipments, leading to an increased cost of deployment,” she said. “Hence, the resultant ROI for medium-sized companies with a few tens of thousands of employees is relatively low.”

Overall, market growth is expected to be driven primarily by cards-based systems and biometric applications. Offering competitive prices to end users is likely to be a key success factor due to increasing competition from lower cost providers, especially those from China and Taiwan.

Biometric solution to avoid duplication of PAN cards


P Chidambaram

New Delhi: Concerned over increasing misuse of Permanent Account Number (PAN) cards, the Government is likely to introduce biometric solution so that no one can get a duplicate card. A joint Working Group in the Ministry of Finance has given its report after obtaining technical and commercial proposals from leading biometric solution providers, Finance Minister P Chidambaram said in Lok Sabha during Question Hour. “The report is under consideration at present,” the minister said. He also informed the House, that the number of persons suspected to have duplicate PANs are estimated to be 13,10,127 through out the country. The verification exercise as of August 10, 2007 has been completed in respect of 11,43,919 persons, out of which 10,18421 PAN cards have been found to be duplicate and have been deactivated. On the biometric solution, the Minister said “it was being considered so that no one could obtain duplicate card”. Replying to another question with regard to cloning of credit cards resulting in frauds, Chidambaram said: Out of millions of cards issued through out India only 127 instances were reported in 2006 and the amount involved was Rs 235.42 lakh. While in 2007, till June, 61 cases have come forward involving Rs 123.11 crore. The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) as a part of its supervisory process has been sensitising banks from time to time about common fraud prone areas, modus operandi and the measures to be taken by them to prevent or reduce the incidence of frauds in banks. Chidambaram, however, said that it was the responsibility of owner of a credit card to ensure that no body could misuse it. Asked whether any bank employee was involved in cloning of credit cards, the minister said no such instance has been reported. On the proposed unique identification card for multi purposes, Chidamabaram said: The Ministry of Home Affairs was examining the matter and had also launched a pilot project in the border areas before taking a final decision. (PTI)

August 23, 2007

Biometric tracking gives a tamper proof identity to villagers

Remote Gurrampeta, a tribal hamlet, seemed hardly the ideal place to distribute smart cards after an experiment with sophisticated personal tracking or access control systems. The backward village with 150 families was poverty-stricken and calamity prone. All that the tribals here wanted was a decent livelihood that would give them at least a meal a day. So, when Kris Dev and his IT savvy team from Chennai hit this rural reach of Andhra Pradesh, carrying their ‘access technology’ equipment, comprising a biometric device, a 9″ by 6 “equipment weighing barely 500 gms, and a laptop, the villagers did not exactly jump with joy.

”In fact, after setting up the equipment to start their experiment, it suddenly struck us that there was no power supply to Gurrampeta village,” says Kris Dev, a management and ICT consultant, specialising in decentralization and e-governance, co-founder of the Life Line 2 Business (LL2B). He recently won the Manthan Award in the category of ‘e-inclusion and livelihood creation.” The April 2006 experiment by Kris and his team in three villages of Andhra Pradesh, Gurrampeta (V R Puram Mandal in Khammam District), Mohammedabad and Jakulla Kootha Palli (Amadugur Mandal in Ananthapur district) coming under the National Rural Development Employment Guarantee Scheme (NREGA) for ‘Biometric Tracking of Payments under NREGA and others’ was adjudged the best among 25 states in India.

Back in Gurrampeta, Kris and his colleagues, found a 6-volt car battery and kicked off their experiment which promised to usher in radical changes at the grass root level ”where villagers working in agricultural fields, construction sites or factories were always being exploited by greedy, corrupt middlemen.” Their village initiative had been possible only after several rounds of counselling and explanations. It was quite understandable, as the villagers had only recently been taken for a big ride.

Soon after the 2005 floods in coastal Andhra Pradesh spread over Khammam district, the Hyderabad-based Centre for World Solidarity, a NGO, announced solatium of Rs. 500 each for many villages including Gurrampeta. ”A middleman, authorised to distribute the relief money, put his thumbprints across 135 names of affected villagers and pocketed funds worth Rs. 75,000,” says Kris. Only 15 villagers actually got the relief. Kris explained to the disillusioned villagers that this would never happen with a biometric device where each of them would have a ‘unique identity’ by registering their thumbprint into the machine and their photographs integrated through software. So, every time they put their thumb on the optical scan for verification, their photographs would pop up. The biometric device has a provision to enter the citizen’s ID and displays the ID and name on a LCD screen.

”When a villager signs in for work, he registers on he biometric device. He does the same when he finishes work. So, there is an official record of the man days he puts in which cannot be tampered with and he has to be paid for work done on those days. We have work records (muster-rolls) in villages showing how supervisors have tampered with number of working days of villagers so that they could pocket the extra cash,” said Kris. ”A biometric-based smart card where the citizen uses the information of what he has, what he knows and what he is, ensures a high level of security,” he added.

Now, villagers of Gurrampeta, neighbouring Mohammedabad and J K Palli are thrilled with their new identity. But this was just an experiment. Convincing the policy makers to introduce the process on a permanent basis has proved to be more difficult. In fact, one officer wanted to know if the biometric device would work as well with work-worn hands as it did with his ‘soft’ fingers. ”We showed him that the device worked with everyone —a villager working with machines in a factory, whose work-roughened palms were full of corns and those working in cement factories,” points out Kris. So, while he had convinced villagers that a unique ‘biometric’ citizen identity would dramatically change their lives, the greater challenge has been to convince the various state and district administrations.

The investment would be a mere Rs. 20,000 in every village for a battery-run biometric device in conjunction with a suitable software that can register citizens uniquely, avoid duplication, create a data base of citizens and permit online transfer of information for the district and state administrations to view online. Kris is still waiting with crossed fingers for the first invitation to a village in India for implementing the project.

http://www.indianexpress.com/story/21904.html

Villagers working under NREG scheme get tamper-proof identity cards through biometric authentication

Villagers working under NREG scheme get tamper-proof identity cards through biometric authentication

CHENNAI, JUNE 11: Devanti Devi, Dilip Shaw and Bisuandayal Manjhi of the Gonpura panchayat in Bihar will soon be sporting smart job cards that also double up as ATM/debit cards. They are workers under the National Rural Employment Guarantee programme (NREG) and are among 170 men and women in two villages who would be the first to be registered as NREG members through a foolproof biometric verification device.

For three days from last Tuesday, after the initial hostility and scepticism, villagers in Kurkuri and Dhuparchak Mushahari in Phulwarisharif block of Patna district, gathered at the Panchayat office to place their fingers (all 10) on a Korean-made biometric device. Each finger was registered twice for getting the best value of minutiae counts (the whorls and ridges on a finger).

Then the villagers were photographed and all their personal data was registered on their NREG Card. With the photograph and details scanned and attached to their names, the state created a permanent database on the workers.

After the registration process was completed, the verification was done immediately by entering the NREG ID number, and the beneficiary was asked to place any finger on the biometric device, a small machine that is easily portable to the worksite. The individual’s photograph instantly popped up from the database on the computer monitor.

“The technology has been proven through a transparent system. Now we have to link it to our NREG process which will give every member a job card or a smart card and cover entire Bihar,” Anup Mukherji, Commissioner of the Rural Development Department, told The Indian Express.

All that a panchayat would need for implementing a fool-proof registration and verification process is a biometric device costing about Rs. 20,000, a laptop computer of about Rs. 25,000, a webcam or a digital camera and a personnel for operating the devices.

With Nitish Kumar keen on making the poverty alleviation programme a success in his state, his government had initially hit on the idea of fingerprinting each of the NREG workers at the time of registration and during payment of their wages. But this was hardly effective since verification of the fingerprints was a mind-boggling process and required a forensic expert to certify each of them.

It was around this time that an article in The Indian Express on January 28 this year on a biometric tracking concept devised by Kris Dev, a Chennai-based e-governance consultant, caught the attention of the Bihar administration. Mukherji got in touch with Kris Dev and asked him to prove to the state government that the technology worked at the ground level. “If your solution does all that the article describes, it would be ideal for Bihar where people find ways to beat all systems,” Mukherji told Kris Dev.

Dev went to Patna in February to make a presentation to the Bihar State Electronics Corporation and later at two villages. On June 7, Nitish Kumar watched the demo in the two villages that Kris Dev presented and gave a spot clearance for the concept to be implemented throughout Bihar.

“It is surprising that Bihar should become the first state in India to introduce biometric tracking for NREG,” said Dev today.

Fingerprint Biometric Attendance System for Primary Schools

Project Titled : “Fingerprint Biometric Attendance System for Primary Schools in Narmada District (Gujarat)”.

Brief Description:

Supply, installation and commissioning of 600 numbers of standalone Fingerprint Biometric Machines in various primary schools in Narmada District (Gujarat)

Tender Ref.: DPN/FBAS/01/2006

District Panchayat – Narmada
Jilla Panchayat Bhawan-Narmada,
Near Karjan Irrigation Project Office,
Rajpipla, Dist. Narmada (Gujarat) 393 145

Background:

To ensure full enrolment of all eligible students and to reduce drop-out rate in primary education, Government of Gujarat launched “Shala Praveshotsav” (Enrolment Drive) and “Kanya Kelavani Rath” (Girl Chid Education Campaign) from the year 2003. This programme has been very successful and is achieving full enrolment of all the eligible students. 

The extent of coverage of primary education in the state has been satisfactory but high rate of drop-out is a matter of serious concern. In the last three years, the Primary Education Department of Government of Gujarat has introduced several schemes to address the problem of drop-outs.

While lots of initiatives are being taken to improve primary education, it is equally important to sustain and deepen these reforms. After the success of enrolment drives with the achievement of full enrolment, the challenge now is to improve retention and reduce the drop-out.

Apart from socio-economic reasons, absenteeism of teachers, particularly in tribal areas and remote villages is one of the most important reasons for high dropout rates. All noble initiatives of the State Government lose effectiveness and seriousness, when teachers remain absent without due permission, for a long period. Above entioned areas, which are also the areas of lowest female literacy rates are suffering a lot because of this problem. It is urgently needed to have a strong and reliable mechanism to monitor attendance of teachers and students.

In order to have strict watch on the attendance of the teachers and the students, a Fingerprint Biometric School Attendance System was proposed for Narmada District. Government of Gujarat has accepted the proposal and has sanctioned a pilot project of a Fingerprint Biometric Attendance System for all primary schools in Narmada District to be implemented by the District Panchayat – Narmada (Rajpipla). After implementation, Narmada probably will become the first district in the country to cover all primary schools by a Fingerprint Biometric Attendance System.

Pilot Project:

The pilot project is planned to cover 680 primary schools, 70 Cluster Resource Centres (CRCs) and 4 Block Resources Centres (BRCs) in Narmada District. It will cover around 2508 teachers and 76,000 students. A stand alone fingerprint biometric machine with external un-interrupted power supply upto 12 hours will be installed in each primary school for recording attendance of teachers as well as students. At the end of the month, the attendance data will be transported to the taluka (Block) HQ in a portable memory device like a pen drive. This attendance data will be processed with the help of a software application for getting pay rolls of teachers and other various reports.

The pilot project has a great scope of further expansion depending upon its success in Narmada district. Narmada district is one of the most backward districts of Gujarat having predominant tribal population and low literacy indicators. The pilot model of biometric attendance system is most likely to be replicated in all other districts of Gujarat if it is tested successful in a district like Narmada. The expanded project is expected to cover around 40,000 schools, which are to be covered, in a phased manner, in the coming 2-3 years.

Pilot Project Implementation:

As an implementing agency District Panchayat – Narmada (Rajpipla) has decided that the procurement of the standalone Fingerprint Biometric Machines (FBMs) along with accessories would be through National Competitive Bidding while the software application would be developed by the NIC-Gujarat. To carry out this objective, District Panchayat – Narmada proposes to finalise a rate contract with only manufacturers of Fingerprint Biometric Machines (FBMs) in India for supply, installation and commissioning of standalone FBMs as per specifications given in the tender document.

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